Wilson High School Summer Reading

  • Wilson High School Summer Reading Assignments

    All students should participate in the Multnomah County Library Summer Reading Program.

    If you are signed up to take AP English Language, AP Literature, or AP Capstone Seminar, you have additional required summer reading assignments. Click on the link for your course or scroll down to see the assignments.

    General Summer Reading Assignment: Multnomah County Lubrary Summer Reading Program

    AP English Language & Composition Summer Reading Assignment

    AP Capstone Year 1: Seminar Summer Reading Assignment

    AP English Literature & Composition Summer Reading Assignment

     

    General Summer Reading Assignment

    This year, we would like all students to participate in the Multnomah County Library Summer Reading Program. It is our hope that you thoroughly enjoy your well-deserved vacation. Pursue your own interests and passions, while taking some time to read what you want to read.

    The Wilson High School Library will have a summer reading party in the fall for all students who complete the Multnomah County Library Card Summer Reading program. We will have a treat during tutor time and you will be entered into a drawing for a gift card. This is in additional to all of the incredible prizes offered through Multnomah County Library!

    To be entered into the drawing at the Wilson High School Library Summer Reading Party:

    1. Post a “shelfie” of yourself with a book you read in any Multnomah County Library Branch to Instagram. Tag @wilson.hs.lib and Multnomah County Library
    2. Come to the summer reading party in the fall wearing your summer reading t-shirt
    3. Take a picture of your completed game board or a screenshot of your completed online game and bring it to the summer reading party

    How to play (Teens entering grades 9-12)
    Explore a universe of stories and a galaxy of fun at your library! Read for fun and prizes this summer. It all kicks off June 14. High school teens can play online or on paper.

    1. Sign up online starting June 14 and track your reading on the mobile site or come in to any Multnomah County library to get a gameboard (it’s free).
    2. If you play online, enter every day you read about an hour. On the gameboard, mark a space every time you read for an hour or do any of the challenge activities
    3. If you play online, the site will let you know when you earn your prizes. When you’ve filled your first card, you can bring it to the library and choose a coupon or entry in a drawing on or after June 28. Do the same with card 2 (prizes available starting July 13) and card 3 (prizes available starting July 28).
    4. When you have filled all three cards, you’ve completed the challenge! You’ll get a prize, a T-shirt (while supplies last), coupons for Oaks Park, Oregon Ballet Theatre, Oregon Symphony and Oregon Children’s Theatre, and an entry in the Grand Prize drawing! Claim your prizes by August 31, 2019.

    Adapted from Multnomah County Library. More details available at: https://multcolib.org/summer-reading


    Summer Reading Assignment for AP English Language

    (Part of Quarter 1 Grade)

     

    PDF
    Summer Reading Assignment

     

    Congratulations! You have accepted the challenge of taking the AP English Language and Composition course in the fall. The course is organized into nine units which are all designed to support your growth as critical readers and effective writers.

    It is our hope that you thoroughly enjoy your well-deserved vacation. Pursue your interests and passions, relax, reflect, spend time with friends and family, maybe even “veg” out on Netflix a bit! We are excited about continuing to develop this growing course at Wilson, and are looking forward to 2019/20 with much anticipation!

    --Wilson AP Language Teachers

    P.s.: Should you have questions about the course or assignment, please email: jsuehiro@pps.net. Queries will be checked on a periodic basis this summer, so you may not receive a response right away.

     


    Summer Reading Assignment for AP Capstone Year 1: Seminar

    (Part of Quarter 1 Grade)

     

    PDF
    Summer Reading Assignment

    Congratulations! You have accepted the challenge of being one of Wilson’s first candidates eligible to earn the AP Capstone Diploma in 2021! This coming fall you will be enrolled in AP Seminar, one of Wilson’s brand new AP courses.

    In order to prepare for our seminar class in the fall, we will all read a common book called: Think Like a Freak, by Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt. It is available on Amazon and in other stores in paperback. It is also available at the Multco Library and there are limited copies for checkout in the Wilson Library.

    It is our hope that you thoroughly enjoy your well-deserved vacation.  Pursue your interests and passions, relax, reflect, spend time with friends and family, maybe even “veg” out on Netflix a bit! We are excited about continuing to develop this growing course at Wilson, and are looking forward to 2019/20 with much anticipation!

    Sincerely,

    AP Capstone Teachers

    P.s.: Should you have questions about the course or assignment, please feel free to email: jsuehiro@pps.net or clanzas@pps.net. Queries will be checked on a periodic basis over the summer. You may not receive a response right away, but we will do our best!


     

    Summer Reading Assignment for AP English Literature & Composition

    (note: This is the summer assignment for AP English Literature; for AP English Language scroll back)

    Printable version

    As a student of AP English, you will be expected to begin next year having read at least two books from the list that follows. During the first week of school you will have an essay exam on these two works. The test will mirror, in spirit, if not exact format, the essay section of the AP English Literature exam. On such tests, you are asked to explore your reading through an analytical lens. In doing so, your use of literary devices and depth of thematic exploration are important. Thus, while it will not be required to turn in a formal journal, the English Department highly encourages you to keep an informal journal of your impressions and ideas as you read.

    Here are some potential points of literary exploration for you to consider:

    • How does the author’s use of setting reflect symbolic and/or archetypal concepts?
    • How does the novel reflect the aesthetic conventions of its time?
    • What relevant issues of social concern are explored?
    • What is still relevant about the book today?
    • What do you enjoy about the author’s writing style? Is it their descriptive clarity? Is it an unconventional use of language? Perhaps it is the flair the character dialogue expresses. Conversely, please feel comfortable in noting which elements of the work you found less attractive and/or effective. But remember: be able to support your assertions.
    • Pay careful attention to character development throughout the novel. Which characters are most clearly explored? What do their actions, thoughts, dialogue and presence lend to the work’s overall structure (thematically or with respect to plot development, for example)?
    • Please: Focus on utilizing the array of critical tools you have developed as you have evolved as a reader and writer. What literary devices do you recognize? Moreover, how do you view them as tools of the author?

     

    Edward Albee—Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf

    Jane Austen—Persuasion

    Samuel Beckett—Waiting for Godot

    Charlotte Bronte—Jane Eyre

    Michael Chabon—Telegraph Avenue

    Joseph Conrad—Lord Jim

    Charles Dickens—Oliver Twist

    Fyodor Dostoevsky—Crime and Punishment

    Jeffrey Eugenides—The Virgin Suicides

    William Faulkner—The Sound and the Fury

    Gustav Flaubert—Madame Bovary

    Jonathan Safron Foer—Extremely Loud and
    Incredibly Close

    E. M. Forster—Howard’s End

    Herman Hesse—Steppenwolf

    Oscar Wilde—The Importance of Being Earnest

    Barbara Kingsolver—Flight Behavior

    Toni Morrison—The Song of Solomon

    Thomas Pynchon—Gravity’s Rainbow

    E. Annie Proulx—The Shipping News

    Joyce Carol Oates—Foxfire

    Philip Roth—American Pastoral

    Brian DoyleMink River

    William Shakespeare—The Tempest

    Leo Tolstoy—Anna Karenina

    John Updike—Rabbit Run

    Robert Penn Warren—All the King’s Men

    Edith Wharton—Ethan Frome

    William J. KennedyIronweed

    Virginia WoolfTo the Lighthouse


    Wilson High School Summer Reading Links

    We hope this comprehensive list of sites including links to current news articles about summer reading and why we do it will come in handy for students and parents.

    News
    LA Times
    Washington Post
    NY Times Room for Debate
    NY Times Opinion Page
    The Onion (Satirical News Site)
    Oregonlive
    BBC news
    USA Today

    Newsela- Use your apps4pps login

    College-Bound Reading
    YALSA Book Finder App
    Popular High School Classics
    UCBerkeley Summer Reads

    New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2017

    Nonfiction Books
    Modern Library 100 Best Nonfiction
    The Guardian’s 100 Best Non-fiction Books
    New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2017

    High Interest Reading Lists and Young Adult Books


    Recommended for English Learners
    Good Reads ESL Book List
    Newsela

    Other Lists
    Oregonian Top 10 Northwest Books 2015
    Kirkus Book Review Site

    Articles about Summer Reading
    Washington Post Article on High School Reading
    NY Times Room for Debate: The Crush of Summer Homework
    NEA Article on Summer Reading
    Washington Post Article on Summer Reading
    NYTimes Reading List for High School