• Alliance High School @ Meek Campus

    Digital Media/Graphic Design

    Manufacturing Technology

    Natural Resources

    Auto/Transportation Technology


    Digital Media/Graphic Design
    Instructor: Amy Taramasso

    Digital Media & Design Production
    Explores advanced concepts in graphics applications in web and print-based scenarios. Students use digital photography, web design, and graphic design skills to complete independent projects from conception to production. Students prepare for their post-secondary steps by creating portfolios of their work and formulate post-secondary goals. Introduces desktop publishing using InDesign and printing terms.

    Digital Media Design
    Introduces the creation of content for gaming and applications for AR and VR. Includes options for advanced work in web design, including using WordPress to create and manage a website, with other options to use Adobe Dreamweaver to create and maintain a website. Includes opportunities for advanced work in applications, including but not limited to Photoshop, and Illustrator, Unity.

    Graphics for Digital Media
    Continues the study of computer applications for creating graphics and content for the web. Introduces the basic concepts of graphic design, including design elements and principals. Emphasizes the design process, developing an idea from thumbnail sketch, through tight roughs, to a comprehensive design. Expands the production of web content including advanced HTML and CSS techniques, uploading pages to a server using an FTP client, site management, and accessibility.

    Introduction to Digital Media
    Students learn how to use the Macintosh operating system to create and organize their work. Students learn the fundamentals of computer applications such as Photoshop, Illustrator. Students are introduced to the basics of key digital media skills and design terminology. Options include a study of the basics of web design using HTML5.


    Manufacturing Technology
    Instructor: Jerry Eaton

    Introduction to Manufacturing A - D
    The student will develop content knowledge and practical skills through projects requiring laying out of the pattern, cutting metal to size and bending and joining by the method specified. Students will do tutorials in Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing. And students will study and practice safety, reading and use of hand tools. Finally the student will reflect on the learning either through writing or speaking. Units A & B (.5 credit) are required for program completers.

    Machining A through K
    The student will work to develop content knowledge and practical skills by producing projects with hand machining, manual lathe, manual mill, or CNC mill. Layout skills and precision measurement play a critical role in all projects. Finally the student will reflect on the learning either through writing or speaking. Units B, C and G align to PCC coursework and dual credit standards.

    Machining Projects
    The student will work to develop content knowledge and practical skills by producing projects with hand machining, manual lathe, manual mill or CNC mill. Layout skills and precision measurement play a critical role in all projects. Finally the student will reflect on the learning either through writing or speaking.

    Manufacturing Projects
    This course is designed to assist the students in applying the CRLSs such as personal management and problem solving skills to complete an advanced-level manufacturing project. The student will work to develop content knowledge and practical skills. Practical skills will be learned by producing projects using either sheet metal, machining or welding. The student will initiate the project idea (approved by the instructor), complete a plan, execute the plan and assess the results. All of the steps will be recorded in a log or journal. Finally the student will reflect on the learning through a public presentation of the final project.

    Pre-Engineering
    This course is designed to assist students in applying the CRLSs such as personal management and problem solving skills to complete an advanced-level manufacturing project. The student will work as part of a team to develop content knowledge and practical skills. Practical skills will be learned by producing a robot that will compete in a challenge against other robots. The students will study the science of mechanical, electrical and software engineering. They will work together to design the robot. The robot build will be another team effort. All of the steps will be recorded in a log or journal. Finally, if the student decides to complete an extended application, the student will reflect on the learning through a public presentation of the final project.

    Sheet Metal A - D
    The student will develop content knowledge and practical skills through projects requiring laying out of the pattern, cutting metal to size, and bending and joining by the method specified. Finally the student will reflect on the learning either through writing or speaking.

    Welding A - R
    The student will work to develop content knowledge and practical skills by practicing cutting metal to size and practicing welds as specified. Students will learn oxy-acetylene cutting and welding, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW or stick), gas metal arc welding (MIG/MAG or wire feed), and tungsten arc welding (TIG). With most units, the students will take a written and a practical final at PCC. Finally the student will reflect on the learning either through writing or speaking. Most units align to PCC coursework and dual credit standards.

    Welding Projects
    The student will work to develop content knowledge and practical skills by practicing cutting metal to size and practicing welds as specified. Students will learn oxy-acetylene cutting and welding, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW or stick), gas metal arc welding (MIG/MAG or wire feed), and tungsten arc welding (TIG). With most units, the students will take a written and practical final at PCC. Finally the student will reflect on the learning either through writing or speaking.


    Natural Resources
    Instructor: Joe Ferguson

    Engineering Technology
    Student learns and applies the principle of design, construction, wiring, buoyancy and soldering necessary for building a working Remote Operating Vehicle for Marine Advanced Technology Education competition. Student also writes a technical paper, makes a poster and presents a report. Skill level is Beginning to Advanced.

    Environmental Science
    Semester 1: Forest Ecology - Examines structure and function of Oregon forest ecosystems. Covers distribution and interactions of plants, animals, microorganisms, climate and basic geology. Laboratory emphasizes identification and environmental testing. Semester 2: Bird ID & Ecology - An introductory course to the biology of birds of the Pacific Northwest. Emphasizes learning bird identification in the field by sight and sound. Aspects of avian ecology, natural history, evolution and behavior will be studied. The student will be introduced to field techniques for identifying and studying birds.

    Marine Science
    Provides an overview of the marine life sciences, focusing on physiology of ocean, four habitats of the ocean - kelp forests, coral reefs, polar oceans, and hydrothermal plumes. Students study the various phyla of the animal kingdom, marine sanctuaries, and effects of man on ecosystems. In addition, laboratory experiences will introduce students to the scientific method.

    Natural Resources I
    Student will study ecology, population dynamics, stream ecology, meteorology, energy, botany, compass & map reading and resource management. The course emphasizes field study, lab work, lecture and group work.

    Natural Resources II
    Student will study ecology, population biology, cartography, map making, hydrology, geology, basic chemistry, taxonomy, evolution, water quality chemistry and resource management. The course exphasizes field study, lab work, lecture and group work.

    Career Exploration
    The student completes application materials and volunteers at a variety of community organizations. The student performs routine duties as assigned by the organization and will complete a student time sheet to be signed by the supervisor documenting hours worked and activities performed.


    Auto/Transportation Technology
    Instructor: Matt Kincaid

    Automotive Projects
    Auto Projects class is an advanced class to allow students to bring in personal projects and school lead. This will allow students to broaden skills and personal confidence in skills they have developed.

    Automotive Tech 1
    Automotive Systems 1 is a foundation course of basic safety, engine and brake fundamentals. In this course by applying automotive principles in a workshop setting, students learn the fundamental skills essential for success in the Automotive Technology field. Automotive Orientation - Students will be introduced to automotive shop work including safety, hand tools, measurement, and small engine (lawn mower) construction and operation. Literacy skills will be emphasized.

    Automotive Tech 2
    Automotive Systems 2 is a foundation course of basic ignition and computer controlled systems and engine tune-up and performance. In this course, by applying automotive principles in a workshop setting, students learn the fundamental skills essential for success in the Automotive Technology field. Computer Controlled Systems - This course prepares the student to describe basic Computer Controlled systems and their components. Literacy skills are emphasized.

    Automotive Tech 3
    Automotive Systems 3 is an advanced course covering carburetor and injection fuel systems, also wheel and output shaft and bearing service. Fuel Systems: Injection/Carburetor - This course provides students with the knowledge to identify the components and describe the purpose of both the carburetor and injection fuel systems. Literacy skills are emphasized.