• Relevant and rigorous, CTE courses are aligned with industry standards to prepare you for high-wage, high-skill and high-demand occupations.

     

    Career Technical Education (CTE) Programs | Salem-Keizer Public Schools

    Career & Technical Education is delivered in a sequence of classes known as a Program of Study. To earn a CTE teaching license or endorsement in Oregon, our faculty must have industry experience and be approved by an Instructor Appraisal Committee, convened by the school district and comprised of business, industry and education professionals. There are many interesting electives to explore and enjoy at LHS, but Career Technical Education Programs of Study are specially designed to help you develop technical skills and knowledge in a specific area of expertise. Think of your CTE Program of Study as your high school "major."

    CTE Honors Requirements
    In order to complete a CTE program and receive CTE Honors, a student must complete at least two courses in one program of study and take a Technical Skill Assessment at the end of the sequence of classes. In Culinary Arts, for example, students would take the Technical Skills Assessment after passing Intro to Culinary Arts, World Cuisine and Commercial Foods & Bakery. CTE Completers earn a special cord to wear at graduation. 

    College Credit
    Some LHS CTE courses qualify for Dual Credit, allowing the student to earn both college credit and high school credit. Dual Credit courses are aligned with specific courses at an Oregon community college or, in the case of some LHS business classes, with Portland State University. Entering college with credits may allow students to graduate in less time or to take advanced coursework sooner in their college career.

    CTE Classes Fulfill Oregon Graduation Requirement

    In Oregon, students must earn three credits in their choice of CTE courses, World Languages and/or Visual & Performing Arts. Enrolling in CTE courses is one way to meet this diploma requirement for focused electives.

    Here is a list of current state-approved Programs of Study offered at Lincoln.


    Audio Engineering

    Faculty: David Kays

    audio1  audio2

    Beginning Audio Engineering

    Audio Production 1-2 is designed to give students the basic knowledge and technical skills needed to prepare them for postsecondary study or entry level employment in the audio industry. The students will develop the technical skills necessary to operate the equipment to produce a finished audio product in both studio situations and live performance. Students will develop knowledge of the business of music which will include publishing and promotional issues. They will also study the language of music. In all situations, students will present themselves with integrity and professional behavior.

    Advanced Audio Engineering

    Students will learn to apply advanced skills and knowledge through recording, music production, and sound design projects. These will include working with our local partners in work-related learning experiences (as opportunities allow). Not only will students record people in our studio, but they will also continue mastering skills towards industry certification. Students in Advanced Audio Engineering will increase their portfolio of experience by running sound at assemblies, school concerts, and other school events. 

     

    Business & Management
    Faculty: Henry Hooper and Ron Waugh

    Twitter @Business_LHS and Instagram @business_lhs

    Mr. Waugh  Hooper

    Introduction to Business

    Introduction to Business will help students build a strong knowledge base and develop business skills as they study basic economic concepts, business ownership & operations, business management, business communication, business ethics & social responsibility, human resources, culture & diversity in business, marketing, financial & technological resources, leadership & teamwork, marketing, economics, and career opportunities.

    A basic understanding of these concepts through project-based learning, real-time learning with seasoned business professionals and leadership development activities will give students a firm foundation for continuing business study and/or entering the workplace.

    Personal Finance: Introduction
    This class will help you understand the importance of the financial world, including planning and managing money wisely. Areas of study will include sources of income, budgeting, banking, consumer credit, credit laws and rights, personal bankruptcy, insurance, spending, taxes, investment strategies, savings accounts, mutual funds, buying a vehicle, and living independently. Based on the hands-on skills and knowledge applied in this class you will develop financial goals and create realistic and reasonable objectives to be “money smart.”

    Personal Finance & Investment: College Credit Option

    Personal Finance is a course that  will provide you with working knowledge of the following: 

    1. Planning Process: to be able to use quantitative tools for measuring financial well-being, understand the importance of time value of money, calculate the impact of taxes on financial decisions
    2. Managing Your Money: to understand the different strategies associated with controlling your financial plan through cash management, credit management, and management of major purchases
    3. Protecting Yourself with Insurance: to understand risk management and the utilization of financial planning process, of insurance products to control your future financial health
    4. Managing Your Investment: to understand the importance of investment goals and tools (stocks, bonds, mutual funds and real estate), be able to calculate tax impacts, and understand the concept of risk versus return, diversification, asset allocation and market efficiency
    5. Retirement and Estate Planning: to understand the importance of establishing a sound, simple retirement plan at the earliest stages of your financial life cycle utilizing tax, insurance and investment planning.

      Note: Juniors and seniors have the option to take this class for 4 college credits from Portland Community College. (Sophomores may also be accepted into the dual credit program, after an interview and assessment by the instructor.)

    Business Communication: College Credit Option

    What message are you sending when you speak, write, and listen? Verbal and nonverbal communication skills are key to success in business. Whether you work for someone else, plan to seek employment, or want to start your own business in the future, you need to understand your audience and how to effectively reach it.

    Business Communication provides an in-depth study of verbal and nonverbal communication from a business perspective. It introduces techniques for choosing the right format, tone, and message for diverse audiences as well as the most appropriate way to deliver the message. It also identifies the barriers that can prevent effective communication.

    Note: Juniors and seniors have the option to take this class for 4 college quarter credits from Portland Community College. (Sophomores may also be accepted into the dual credit program after an interview and assessment by the instructor.) 

    Introduction to Marketing

    Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with a broad background on the nature and scope of marketing concepts used in business. 

    Course Objectives: Marketing is a core business course. It is designed to give students a clear understanding of the marketing function, introduce students to the elements of the marketing mix (4P’s) and demonstrate how today’s managers employ these tools to gain a competitive edge in the global economy. 

    Learning Outcomes:  

    • Understand the role of the marketing function within a firm.  
    • Describe key market segmentation and targeting strategies. 
    • Identify the elements of the marketing mix (4P’s) and common strategies used with each tool.  
    • Recommend and justify an appropriate mix of the 4P’s to create a cohesive marketing strategy for a new product.  
    • Identify and relate key trends impacting consumers and the practice of marketing to established theory. 

    During this course students will have an opportunity to develop critical thinking and presentation skills during weekly workshops designed to reinforce the concepts presented in class. The semester will culminate in a final team project where students will creatively employ the principles presented in this core class through the development of a marketing plan.

    Construction Management

    This course provides students with an overview of the diverse employment opportunities within the construction industry. Students will learn the skills necessary and required to manage large and small scale construction projects, from the early planning phase through project completion.

    • Overview of the Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) Industry
    • Reading construction documents – Drawings and Specifications
    • Cost estimating and budgeting
    • Contract negotiation
    • Legal considerations, insurance and risk mitigation
    • Utilizing Building Information Modeling to map out building elements before on-site building starts
    • Interfacing with Designers, Engineers and Local and State building inspectors
    • Developing a Critical Path Method (CPM) project schedule
    • Basic personal safety protocols and on-site safety requirements
    • Effective on-site management of subcontractors
    • Change order management and mitigation utilizing project management software
    • Meet industry professionals and see real-life applications of construction management skills

    IB Business Management SL: College Credit Option

    IB Business Management SL builds upon skills learned in Intro to Business and will focus on businesses operating in the local, national, and global marketplace. The course emphasizes the integration of the various functional areas of business as the firm evolves from its entrepreneurial origins to a mature corporation. Included in the course curriculum is group work on the creation of a business plan. Key course topics include:

    • Business and Economics
    • Business Ethics and Social Responsibility
    • International Business
    • Legal Entities
    • Small Business, Entrepreneurship, and Franchising
    • Business Management
    • Organization, Teamwork, and Communication
    • Service and Manufacturing Operations
    • Human Resources
    • Marketing
    • Accounting & Finance

    A mastery of these concepts through project-based, real-time learning with seasoned business professionals and leadership development activities gives students a firm foundation for continuing business study at the university level and/or entering the workplace.

    This course will prepare students to take the IB Business Management SL exam. Note: Juniors and seniors have the option to take this class for 4 college quarter credits from Portland Community College. (Sophomores may also be accepted into the dual credit program after an interview and assessment by the instructor.) Further, students have the option to take this class for IB credit (Group 3: Individuals and Societies). If the course is taken for IB credit, however, a student may not take the course for dual college credit.

    IB Business Management HL

    IB Business Management HL further develops students’ understanding of business theories learned in Intro to Business and IB Business Management SL and applying those tools and skills by creating a real business. 

    Key topics, building upon the SL curriculum, include:

    • Human resource management
      • Organizational planning tools
      • Organizational (corporate) culture
      • Industrial/employee relations
    • Finance
      • Budgets and Efficiency Ratio Analysis
      • Investment appraisal
    • Marketing
    • Sales forecasting
    • The extended marketing mix of seven Ps
    • Operations management
    • Lean production and quality management
    • Production planning
    • Research and development

     A mastery of these concepts through project-based, real-time learning with seasoned business professionals and leadership development activities gives students a firm foundation for continuing business study at the university level and/or entering the workplace.

    This course will prepare students to take the IB Business Management HL exam.

     

    Computer Science Tech

    Faculty: Ranjani Krishnan

    On the web as Krishnan mathematics

    Ms. Krishnan

     

    INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE 1

    This course explores basic computational thinking and programming concepts through project based learning. The class uses SNAP! or Scratch, a visual block-based programming language, to introduce students to coding for the first time. If the SNAP! curriculum is completed, the class transitions to an industry standard text-based programming language called Python.

    INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE 2

    This course, taken after completing Intro to CS 1, is an introduction to programming using a high-level language. It is primarily a lab-based class. Students will write a series of short programs that will teach them how a program is constructed to solve a problem and then learning how to compile and execute the program.  The course will cover basic data types (integer, real, Boolean, character) and will introduce one collection (arrays). Basic object-oriented programming will be discussed but it is not the focus of the class. Students will learn about algorithms and creating those algorithms using assignment statements, conditional statements, looping constructs, and methods. Also, fundamental representation of data inside the computer will be covered including 2’s complement representation of integers and ASCII code. The very basics of what happens inside the computer will also be covered (ALU/CPU fetch-decode and execute cycle).

    ESSENTIALS OF GAME PROGRAMMING

    Study the principles of game design as you create a concept for board or card games. Use software programs like Game Maker (and if time permits, Unity) to create 2D games that have learning outcomes such as teaching vocabulary, skills, ideas or concepts from any subject you have studied or are still studying (Biology, Chemistry, Math, Physics, Economics, Music, Art, etc.). This CTE class is structured like a real world work environment where students are expected to work in teams, meet strict deadlines, and put forth their best efforts.

    3D DESIGN AND PRINTING

    Learn about 3D design, modeling and printing. We will take a product from concept to a final 3D printed object. We will explore 3D rendering with tools like Tinkercad and Fusion 360 and also cover 3D printing. We will work to together to design pieces for fit and build with material tolerances in mind. This CTE class is structured like a real world work environment where students are expected to work in teams, meet strict deadlines, and put forth their best efforts.


     

    Design and Applied Arts

    Faculty: Addy Kessler

    On the web as Cardinal Clay and Instagram @cardinalclay

    Ms. Kessler

    The Art of Product Design 1-2

    The Art of Product Design is a project based course that explores form, function and aesthetics. We will explore a variety of materials and techniques such as:  leathercraft, woodworking, hand and machine sewing, textile weaving/dyeing/printing, garment design, mold making and casting. Students will create prototypes as well as refined final products for each design challenge. Class sessions are primarily workshop based and include hands-on activities, group discussion, demonstrations, and slide-presentations to reinforce the key ideas. Topics covered include identifying consumer needs, investigating problems in design, refining ideas, material use, the environmental impact of production, designing for production and manufacturing, production costs and retail pricing. We will meet with local designers and visit a variety of local production facilities to learn about their process and products. Students will learn about a broad range of design related careers and gain an understanding for the impact and influence that craft and design can have on the world.

    Instruction and assessment is standards based. Each unit of study is presented with specific criteria in technical skills, design and compositional requirements, and content exploration. Proficiency is assessed using a quarterly portfolio scoring guide.

    The Art of Product Design 3-4

    The Art of Product Design 3-4 is a continuation of the 1-2 curriculum giving students the opportunity to delve deeper into the world of design and their personal aesthetics. In this course we will explore fine metals/jewelry design, garment patterning and making, woodworking/joinery and furniture building, advanced leathercraft techniques, and brand identity. Class sessions are primarily workshop based and include hands-on activities, group discussion, demonstrations, and slide-presentations to reinforce the key ideas. This course pairs well with the IB Multidisciplinary Visual Arts course and prepares students to study  Visual Arts, Product Design and Industrial Design at the college level, as well as preparing students for careers in the trades. We will meet with local designers and visit a variety of local production facilities to learn about their process and products. We will also take regularly scheduled visits to the Portland Art Museum for guided tours of exhibits that relate to the topics we are covering in class.

    Instruction and assessment is standards based. Each unit of study is presented with specific criteria in technical skills, design and compositional requirements, and content exploration. Proficiency is assessed using a quarterly portfolio scoring guide.

    The Art of Product Design 5-6

    The Art of Product Design 5-6 gives students the opportunity to delve deeper into the world of design, their personal aesthetics, and design interests. In addition to assigned projects, students will have the opportunity to explore their own ideas through supported independent projects and full access to the classroom studio shop and equipment. Class sessions are primarily workshop based, and include hands-on activities, group discussions, demonstrations and slide-presentations to reinforce key ideas. This course pairs well with the IB Multidisciplinary Visual Arts course and prepares students to study Visual Arts, Product Design and Industrial Design at the college level, as well as preparing students for careers in the trades. We will meet with local designers and visit a variety of local production facilities to learn about their process and products. We will seek out internship and job shadowing opportunities for students who are interested in furthering their exploration into product design related career paths.

    Instruction and assessment is standards based. Each unit of study is presented with specific criteria in technical skills, design and compositional requirements, and content exploration. Proficiency is assessed using a quarterly portfolio scoring guide.

     

    Hospitality & Tourism-Culinary Arts

    Faculty: Melanie Hammericken

    Instagram @lincolnculinary

    Chef Hammericksen

    Culinary Arts 1-2: Introduction
    Besides learning nutritious recipes, you will also learn kitchen safety, how to read a recipe, how to measure ingredients, as well as the importance of a clean kitchen. Learn your way around a home kitchen (your family will enjoy your homework), then compare and contrast the requirements for a commercial kitchen. Lectures from food industry professionals and field trips to food carts, restaurants and farms offer students insight into the many aspects of the culinary world.  An independent project will require you to apply your new knowledge and skills in a real world setting. Examples might include drafting a plan for your own food business, creating a cookbook, developing a world hunger relief project, writing a food blog, or preparing the menu and cooking for a major event. All students must learn kitchen safety and sanitation practices in order to obtain their Multnomah County Food Handler’s Card within the first two weeks of the course ($10 fee required).Cooking lab dress code will comply with industry practices (long pants, closed toed shoes, hairnet for long hair, etc.).

    Culinary Arts 3-4: Intermediate

    Culinary Arts 3-4 is a year-long course with an emphasis on advanced culinary and baking techniques. We will be perfecting and building on skill sets acquired during the Intro to World Cuisine/Culilnary 1-2 course.

    Students will learn about ingredients, preparation techniques, and flavor profiles. This course will involve the use of more extensive food preparation techniques, as well as expand upon lessons taught in the introductory course regarding menu planning, food-costing and recipe development, writing and modification. We will also focus on the different aspects of producing food commercially. Students will create and build their own “Bakery or Cafe”, including developing logos, marketing and promoting, costing and pricing their product. Students in this class must participate in two or more volunteer events before or after school per semester. The course will build upon students’ knowledge of safety and sanitation practices by teaching them principles of food storage and handling in the context of restaurants, hotels and other large-volume venues. Advanced Culinary and Baking will further prepare students for life after high school, careers in food production (found in hotels, healthcare facilities and restaurants) and other culinary careers.

    Culinary Arts 5-6: Advanced

    Culinary 5-6- Advanced Baking is a year-long course with an emphasis on advanced baking techniques. We will be perfecting and building on skill sets acquired during the Culinary 3-4 Commercial Foods and Baking course.

    Students will learn about ingredients, preparation techniques, and flavor profiles. This course will involve the use of more extensive food preparation techniques, We will also focus on the different aspects of producing food commercially. Students will manage the Lincoln High Coffee cart. Including purchasing, marketing and managing the students who run the day to day operations. The students will create and build their own “Bakery or Cafe”, including developing logos, marketing and promoting, costing and pricing their product. Students in this class must participate in two or more volunteer events before or after school per semester. The course will build upon students’ knowledge of safety and sanitation practices by teaching them principles of food storage and handling in the context of restaurants, hotels and other large-volume venues. Advanced Baking will further prepare students for life after high school, careers in food production (found in hotels, healthcare facilities and restaurants) and other culinary careers.

    Media Studies/Mass Communications
    Faculty: Mary Rechner and Emily Hensley

    www.cardinaltimes.org

    https://www.beyondtheflock.com/

    Instagram @BeyondTheFlock and @CardinalTimes

     

    Ms. Rechner    Ms. Hensley

    Introduction to Mass Communications

    Students will learn foundational skills preparing them to write articles to be published in the online version of The Cardinal Times (and possibly the print version as well.) Students will learn how to think critically about various forms of media, the ethics of journalism, what makes a story worth telling (news values), how to cover a story, how to interview sources, and how to write various kinds of journalism, including but not limited to: breaking news, investigative stories, profiles, editorials, think pieces, sports coverage, and arts and culture stories. Students will also learn how to revise and edit, use digital and social media, and work as a team.

    For students who choose to go on, these foundational skills will prepare them to take Advanced Mass Communications where they will work on Lincoln’s newspaper, The Cardinal Times, or Lincoln’s magazine, Beyond the Flock. Students will also be prepared to join Lincoln’s yearbook, The Cardinal.

    Multimedia Storytelling

    In this introductory project-based class, students will learn and utilize the basics of storyboarding to design and develop high and low tech photo, audio, and video stories about their lives and communities.

    Students will learn the basics of using their phone cameras and recorders, DSLR cameras, and the basics of using Adobe Spark, Adobe Audition, Adobe PhotoShop and Adobe Audition and utilize these tools to tell stories of their choice. In addition students will learn how to tell a story to a group without notes.

    If students choose, they can submit their work to school publications as well as to national outlets, such as the New York Times Learning Network and Student Reporting Labs, an educational project of PBS Newshour.

     

    Mass Communications 1-2/3-4/5-6

    Students who have previously completed Mass Communications are eligible to take Advanced Communications (1-6). In this hands-on course, students will produce high quality journalism and will be provided a real world experience in regularly writing and publishing on a deadline. Students will join a staff and have the opportunity to specialize in writing about sports, music, politics, fashion, health, or other topics of their choice, as well as the opportunity to specialize in photography, design, writing, or marketing. 

    Advanced Communications students will choose to work primarily on either the staff of the magazine, Beyond the Flock, or the newspaper, The Cardinal Times In both cases students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively in teams as well as the opportunity to take on leadership roles, such as section editor or editor-in-chief. In addition, juniors and seniors will complete a job shadow.

    Students who take Mass Communications and at least one year of Advanced Mass Communications are considered program completers


    Yearbook 1-2/3-4/5-6

    This class is responsible for creating the Lincoln Cardinal Yearbook. Students will broaden their knowledge of design, graphics applications, and photography. They will create and publish entire yearbook and will be responsible for specific pages.  In addition, students will learn the processes, purposes,  ethics and responsibilities of  journalism. 

    This course requires a basic knowledge of computer operations; it also requires self-motivation, ethics, interest in digital media and an ability to work well in groups. Because of print deadlines, a full-year commitment is also required (you cannot drop the class once pages have been assigned).  

    Juniors and seniors must complete a job shadow during the first or second semester.

    Students who take Mass Communications and Yearbook are considered CTE program completers.